Monthly Archives: October 2018

Harvesting Herbs

With the threat of frost looming I decided that a herb harvest was in order.

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Bottom Left: Parsley, Bottom Right: Sage, Top Right: Rosemary and Top Left: Thyme

I collected these yesterday. (Are you singing? I was singing in my mind while I cut these.) After dinner I planned to come back for chives and lavender. I didn’t make it back and this morning frost blanketed everything. I was, however, thrilled to find that none of the herbs had been affected by the frost. I was able to harvest chives, spearmint, chocolate mint and lavender today.

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Lavender

I wasn’t the only one interested in the lavender. There were many bumble bees flying from blossom to blossom – collecting nectar I presume. Not wanting to take it all from them, I only harvested about 1/2 of the blossoms.

All of these herbs will be dried, then some will be used for culinary uses, others will be infused into oils for use in soaps or balms, and some (spearmint and or chocolate mint) might be infused in vodka since we enjoyed it the last time I made it.

Now that we have had a frost there are other things that can be harvested; these include rose hips and horse radish. Look for a future post on how I will be using them.

Thanks for reading and until next time – be well. 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

Pumpkin

We didn’t have a great pumpkin crop this year, but we did harvest a few. Today as I was cooking some up to make pumpkin pies I was reminded of this post from 2015.

Don't Eat It! Soap and Skin Care

It’s that time of year. Fall is fast approaching (it arrives this Wednesday in fact) and the harvest is in full force. In fact some of the early crops, like summer squash and green beans might be finished producing, but the late crops like pumpkin and winter squash are just getting ready to be picked. While pumpkins are popularly grown for their use as fall decorations, and people often buy them to make jack-o-lanterns for Halloween, I’m afraid many are missing the true value of pumpkins.

On our morning local news channel last week, there was a segment where a heart doctor was interviewed and he spoke about the health benefits of pumpkin. He touted the large amounts of vitamin A and fiber as the main reasons to eat this heart healthy food but check out this link for more detailed reasons. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/09/04/pumpkin-health-benefits_n_1936919.html

This link also describes benefits of using pumpkin as a treatment for…

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Spam – Are You Kidding Me?

If you are a fellow WordPress blogger you probably are aware of this, but let me explain for those who are not bloggers. WordPress has a feature built into the comments section that filters out spam. I really wasn’t aware of this for quite a while when I first started blogging, but when I did discover the spam box I also discovered that occasionally comments from regular readers would end up in the spam box. It was then that I began checking the spam regularly because I didn’t want to miss comments from my readers.

Recently I received a spam comment (not from any of my regular readers) and I just don’t know what to think of it.

I have copied the message exactly as it was written, and the only change I made was to add quotation marks at the beginning and end.

It said –

“Pease let me know if you’re looking for a writerr
for your blog. You have some really good posts and I believe
I would be a goiod asset. If you ever want to tame some of the load off, I’d absolutely love to write
some articles for your blopg in exchange for a link back to mine.
Pease blast me an email if interested. Cheers!”

Do you see the problem(s) with it?

Personally I hope that this message was written as some kind of a joke. I find it disturbing to think that someone would send a sincere message inquiring about a writing position with that many spelling errors.

What do you think?

 

Soap Making Season

If you have been following my blog for a while and are wondering why there haven’t been any posts about soap on a blog that is called “Don’t Eat It! Soap”, I guess the answer is that it wasn’t soap making season. As farmers our lives revolve around the seasons; our daily activities depend largely on the time of year, the number of daylight hours and the weather. While soap making is not an activity that is necessarily dependent on any of those things it seems for me that soap making, too, has become a seasonal activity.

If you were to go back through my blog you, as I just did, you would find the last mention of soap making in this post from June and that soap was actually made in May. I have discovered that the months of June, July and August are not soap making season for me. I get a good supply of soap made up over winter and spring. Then when we get busy with summer activities I don’t have to take time away to make soap.

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I started making soap again a couple weeks ago when I got orders for two batches – one batch of “Chamomile/Lavender” and one batch of “Just Soap”. The customers that order these are basically buying in bulk, since a batch is 16 bars and they do not come individually wrapped or labeled. They also know that they need to place their order well in advance of when they will need it, since the soap takes approximately 6 weeks to cure.

The next soap that I needed to make was “Turmeric – Yogurt .  My trial run of this soap yielded positive feedback with people telling me they would want more. When I cut up this batch I decided to try out the soap stamp my daughters bought me for Mother’s Day. I only stamped a couple of bars, but I like the way it turned out. I am just not certain yet if I want to commit to stamping every bar because it could be quite time consuming. IMG_4507

The soap I made this week is called “Salad Bar” Soap. I understand if you are thinking “that’s weird”, but I do prefer the term “quirky” – LOL! The ingredients include cucumber puree, yogurt and rosemary. These are all potential salad ingredients – hence the name.

Soap making season will continue throughout the month of October (probably one or two batches per week) so that I can have a good supply ready for the holiday shopping season when I tend to have a higher volume of sales. (Handcrafted soaps make nice gifts.)  During this time you can expect to see some more posts about the weird quirky soaps I make. Who knows I might even add something new.

In November and December I usually don’t make new batches of soap, but I spend a lot of time packaging, labeling and even gift packaging the soaps as they become ready to sell/use. In January, after the holidays, I will again begin making soaps to replenish my supply before the nice weather returns and the farm calls.

If you would like to know more about the varieties of soaps I make or how/where to purchase Don’t Eat It! products you can view them all on my Products page.

Thanks for reading.