All posts by ruthsoaper

Why I don’t Use Palm Oil When Making Soap

This recent post on one of the blogs I follow made me realize this is something that I, as soap maker, should address. https://thecobweboriumemporium.wordpress.com/2018/11/12/theres-a-rang-tan-in-my-bedroom/

If you watch the short (heartbreaking) video in this link (and you should) you probably get the gist, but let me give you a little more detail. When I started making soap, 10+ years ago, I found that most soap recipes called for palm oil. Interestingly, I found some of the sources of these recipes recommended using “sustainable” palm oil. I honestly had no idea what was meant by “sustainable” palm oil, so I did what any person with internet access would do – searched “sustainable palm oil”.

What I learned is that palm oil is widely used in products that we consume (about 50% of the products in our grocery stores contain palm oil) and since production is not able to keep up with demand rain forests are being destroyed in order to plant more oil palm trees. This website gives lots more details and says it way better than I ever could. https://www.palmoilinvestigations.org/about-palm-oil.html

I found it very disturbing that entire habitats and the were being destroyed and wildlife was being killed or displaced in order to satisfy human greed. It seemed unethical and immoral, so at that point I decided rather than adding to the problem by creating more demand,  I would just not use palm oil. In soap making there are many, many oils and many oil combinations that can be used to make nice soaps. Palm oil is simply not necessary.

After reading the post from The Cobweb Emporium I realized that I had been negligent by not passing this information along. I am certain that awareness of the issue is the first step in making a difference. Beyond that it is for each individual to decide on actions they might take. These could include:

  • Seeking and purchasing products that do not contain palm oil or its derivatives. This is not an easy task as there are around 200 ways palm oil can be listed as ingredients. They can be viewed at this link https://www.palmoilinvestigations.org/names-for-palm-oil.html
  • Cooking from scratch and/or making your own soap, skin care and cleaning products.
  • Getting involved with advocacy groups.
  • Contacting companies that use palm oil in their products and ask them to seek alternative ingredients.
  • Share this post with others so they too are aware of the problem and can take action if they choose.

Let your conscious be your guide.

Thanks for reading. 🙂

Port Huron Senior Center Holiday Bazaar Friday November 16

The Port Huron Senior Center is holding is Annual Holiday Bazaar on Friday November 16 from 9am-4pm. The center is located at 600 Grand River Avenue in Port Huron, Michigan.

There will be many vendors selling handcrafted items. If you are in the area I encourage you to stop in and support these local crafters. Be sure to stop by my table to say “Hi” and pick up a bar of Don’t Eat It! soap or a lip balm.

***If you are not in the Port Huron area I encourage you to take some time this Holiday Season to attend a local craft event and support your local merchants as well.

 

 

Some Recent Crochet Projects

I haven’t written about crocheting in a while, so if you haven’t been following my blog for long you may not realize that this is a craft that I really enjoy. Unlike last year when I completed a major crochet project, this year I have kept it pretty simple.

When it comes to crocheting, scarves are about as simple as it gets. Below are three of the scarves I have created.

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The one on the left is a pattern I made up combining two rows of double crochet followed by two rows of broom stick lace and repeating that pattern throughout.

The one in the middle was a pattern that was on the yarn wrapper. It is a combination of V-stiches and shell stitches. I absolutely love the royal colors of this scarf.

The one on the right is an infinity scarf made using a broom stick lace pattern. It is made with Lion Brand Landscapes yarn and is very soft.

You can probably tell I enjoy using variegated yarn for creating scarves. It is fun to watch the piece come together as the colors transition and each scarf becomes a one of a kind.

Thanks for stopping reading. 🙂

 

 

 

It’s Rutting Season. Why You Should Care.

A seasonal reminder – please drive safe.

Don't Eat It! Soap and Skin Care

This afternoon as we were driving back from the farm we saw two deer run across the road. Fortunately they were far enough ahead of us that we didn’t have to slow down, but my husband said, “When you talk to the girls remind them that it is rutting season”.

The girls have heard this term before as every year since they have been driving we give them the warning. Rutting or mating season means an increase in deer activity. The deer are often running at full speed, a male chasing a female, and have no awareness of, or regard for, traffic in the area. So when we tell the girls that it is rutting season we warn them to be extra carful when driving.

What should they do to be extra careful?

  • Focus on driving. Do not allow yourself to become distracted by passengers, eating, cell phones or anything…

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October 2018 Highlights

It seems that October just flew by. There are several things that I intended to write about but just didn’t get the posts finished, so I decided condense them into this not-so-short but sweet post.

Little by little my blog is acquiring new readers, so I want to start by welcoming newcomers to my blog. Feel free to look around and explore previous posts. Please leave me a comment if you find something you like or just to let me know you were here. I always enjoy hearing from readers.

October 2018 Highlights

The Garlic Is Planted!

October is the month for planting garlic in Michigan. The objective is to plant the garlic 4-6 weeks before the ground freezes in order to give the garlic time to establish roots. If you would like to more about our garlic planting process you can check out these two posts from our 2016-2017 growing season.

https://donteatitsoap.com/2016/10/13/a-year-in-growing-garlic-part-ii/

https://donteatitsoap.com/2016/10/18/a-year-in-growing-garlic-part-iii/

This year our wet weather and mostly below normal temperatures in October made for less than ideal planting conditions.  We watched the weather forecasts for our best opportunity and the week beginning October 21st, with several dry days predicted, seemed to be it.

Early that week my husband began preparing the garlic for planting (separating the bulbs into cloves). We, but mostly he, worked on this on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday while we gave the ground time to dry out. By Thursday we could wait no longer – the garlic had to be planted because there was rain in the forecast beginning late Friday.

Despite the ground not being as dry as we hoped, Thursday morning my husband got an early start and planted garlic until nearly dark. For several reason we decided to use a divide and conquer approach so while I attended to other projects my husband worked diligently in the garlic field. Friday morning he again got an early start. When I took the boys (dogs) to the farm for their midday walk he asked if I had checked the radar. Not having done so I couldn’t offer him any idea how long it would be before the rains came. It was late afternoon when he called me. “I just got the last clove planted he said – then the first raindrop fell.” “God is good!” we agreed.

Coincidently, or perhaps by God’s design, we ended up planting during the full moon. We have talked about experimenting with planting by the phases of the moon in past years, but weather and soil conditions have always been more of a priority.

We did scale back on our garlic planting this year. We still planted enough to meet the demands of the markets we currently supply and have seed for the following year. We hope in scaling back on garlic we can put more time and effort into areas where we have not been able to meet demands, namely honey and strawberries.

An Apple A Day

This year we had our best apple crop thus far. While not all of our eight trees produced well, two trees produced more than their fair share. The branches on these young trees were so heavily laden with apples that my husband built posts to brace the branches so they did not break due to their heavy load.

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We harvested 4 milk crates nearly full (we didn’t weigh them). Here’s what I’ve done with them –

Apple Sauce – I’ve canned 22 pints of apple sauce.

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Apple Peeler

When I told my sister I was making apple sauce she asked if I had an apple peeler/corer/ slicer. I laughed and said “Yep, it’s called a paring knife.” LOL. Then as I started peeling all those apples I remembered this antique that I had tucked away on a shelf and had never used. I decided why not give it a try.

One of the problems I have with this and some similar kitchen tools that I have is that they are designed to clamp onto a counter. My kitchen counters were not designed for such uses as they have about a two inch lip that the clamp will not fit over. To accommodate these tools I use a stand alone shelf, but since I don’t often use these tools that shelf is also used to store things. I first had to clear off the shelf and move it to an accessible area. I rinsed the dust off the old apple peeler then clamped it to the shelf. I placed an apple on the prongs of the peeler and began turning the crank. As I turned the crank the blade removed a thin layer of peel from the nice round apple. When it got to the end the apple was pushed off the prongs and popped into the pan I had placed on the shelf to catch the peels. The second apple I tried was not perfectly round and the blade did not touch the flatter areas, so it left strips of peel behind. Considering this, and that I still had to use the paring knife to core and slice the apples, I cleaned up this antique and put it back and the shelf. Lesson learned: My paring knife seemed the better way to go.

Apple Chips – Last year, when we had our first decent apple crop, was the first time I made apple chips (dehydrated apples). We discovered that apple chips make a wonderful snack.

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This year I have filled up my 9 tray dehydrator twice. Each tray holds 3-4 apples and it takes about 20 hours to dehydrate them. When they are finished I store them in small sealable bags usually putting one tray (about three or four servings) per bag. When eating apple chips it is important to consider portion size because they are so good it would be easy to eat too many. It is also important to drink lots of water because they still contain lots of fiber.

Apple Vinegar – This is something I have been reading about and wanting to try for a while. I have seen recipes posted on several blogs and had bookmarked Home and Harrow to return to when I was ready.  My vinegar is still fermenting so I’ll let you know how it turns out in a future post.

Apple Pie – Yesterday I made our third apple pie from this crop. There is just nothing better than homemade apple pie, except maybe homemade pumpkin pie, or homemade blueberry pie or homemade  cherry… well you get the point. It is just so good. I also froze enough pie filling to make six more pies.

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Coffee Cake –  Even with all of that I was still looking for ways to use apples so when I made this coffee cake, which is a recipe that we really enjoy, I decided to add apples. I peeled, cored, and diced three apples and added a layer of apples on top of the streusel in the cake. It turned out fabulous.

I think we are now down to our last 7 or 8 pounds of apples and our plan for those in the next few days is to start a batch of apple wine. Cheers!

Making Soap – You may remember from this post that I consider this time of year soap making season. I haven’t yet come up with any new recipes but I did upgrade a couple of recipes that I have previously made. Perhaps I should add “version 2.0” to their names. :)Let me tell you what I did.

Cocoa Soap – My cocoa soap is made with olive oil and coconut oil as the base oils and coco powder, powdered milk and sugar as additives (just like a cup of hot cocoa might be made). When I first decided to make cocoa soap it was really just for fun. I mean how many of you would love to just bathe yourselves in chocolate? or maybe have dreamt about swimming in the chocolate river on Willie Wonka and the Chocolate Factory? Fun eh? According to this article cocoa may actually have some benefits for the skin, but when it is made into soap I am skeptical as to whether any of those benefits remain. It does however make the soap a deep brown color. The milk adds a creaminess and sugar makes for an extra bubbly lather. What more could you want right?

Actually there was one other ingredient that I use in another soap recipe that just needed to go into this soap, because what goes better in a cup of hot cocoa than ——————————marshmallow. In case you are thinking that I have totally lost my mind – no, I don’t use those sweet little sugary puffs that we all know as marshmallows. What I use is marshmallow root from the marshmallow plants that we grow.

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If you would like to learn more about the heath benefits of marshmallow you can check out this link. https://www.herbwisdom.com/herb-marshmallow.html .

I have been using this herb in my hair care soap for several years now. The marshmallow root is said to add conditioning properties. For the past four years I have exclusively used my homemade soaps (usually hair care or coffee) when washing my hair and in all honesty my hair is healthier than it has ever been.  Don’t Eat It! Cocoa Soap (2.0 🙂 ) should be finished curing around November 23rd, so we will have to wait to find out how it turns out.

Coconut Soap – Like my Cocoa Soap the base oils used in this soap are olive oil and coconut oil.  The additive in this case, however, is shredded coconut. The coconut, while gentle on the skin, adds a little extra scrubbing power. It really is a nice soap, but I decided to make it even nicer this time around by adding yogurt. In the past year I have discovered that adding yogurt to soap gives it a super rich creamy lather and who doesn’t love that?

Incidentally, I once had a lady ask me “Doesn’t the coconut clog up the drain?” and you might be wondering the same thing. The answer is No – nor do the coffee grounds in the coffee soap or the oatmeal in the breakfast bar soap. What does clogs up the drain is hair.  Being the mother of 4 daughters, and all of us having long hair at various times in our lives, I can attest to the fact that hair is what clogs drains.

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Coconut Soap and Cocoa Soap

I also decided to stamp all the bars of these two batches. What do you think?

Thanks for reading. 🙂