To Save The Bees (Part II) Planting

This is part two of the three part series originally published in 2016. Since this post talks about planting trees I will tell you that it was just this week that I realized that the bees are collecting pollen from our maple trees. This was a huge relief for me as early spring seems to be when the bees are the most vulnerable. They may have depleted their winter stores and there are very little, if any, blossoming plants for them to forage. As we watched them flying from the hive and my husband reported seeing them return with pollen I wondered what they were finding. There were only two things had budded – maple trees and poplar trees. I know that bees collect resin from poplar trees to make propolis that they use to seal the hive shut, but after some research I discovered that bees do indeed collect pollen from maple trees.

Don't Eat It! Soap and Skin Care

This was not what I planned on writing about for part II (that post will now become part three) but since it is taking a while to write that post I thought I would quickly tell you what we did Tuesday.

A few weeks ago I decided to order 4 Basswood trees also known as American Linden trees. http://forestry.ohiodnr.gov/basswood I have been shopping local garden centers for these trees for the past two summers but have yet to find them. We were not really sure about ordering bare root trees through the mail, because we haven’t had very good results doing this in the past.  I was able to find a nursery in Michigan that had them for sale, http://www.coldstreamfarm.net/american-basswood-tilia-americana.html  but a 6 hour round trip to purchase a few trees did not seem very practical. Since I really wanted Basswood, ordering them seemed our best option.

I love things that serve multiple…

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2 thoughts on “To Save The Bees (Part II) Planting

    1. All four Basswood trees are slow growing and have yet to produce flowers. They also attract insects during the summer that eat their leaves. They weren’t exactly what I was hoping for but I am still hopeful that in years to come we will see them produce. Thanks for asking.

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